Posts Tagged ‘Credit Suisse’

Nomura Hires First Female CEO – Junko Nakagawa

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

September 2011: According to BBC News, Nomura made a very bold move this week by appointing its first female CEO.  Junko Nakagawa joined Nomura Securities Co. in 1988, working at its underwriting and finance divisions before leaving the company in 2004.  This could start a trend in upward mobility for women in the investment banking field:

Japan’s largest brokerage house, Nomura, has appointed its first female chief financial officer in an unusual move for a top Japanese company. Junko Nakagawa will take up her position on 1 April. Nomura also announced the promotion of Jesse Bhattal to deputy president of the firm’s wholesale banking division. The move is part of a wider effort by some big Japanese companies to offer roles to foreigners to help them move into overseas markets, analysts said. “We have not named Ms Nakagawa as chief financial officer because she is a woman but because she has the capacity to do this job and assume the responsibilities,” Nomura said. “That said, we think is good to encourage diversity in our business.” The promotion is an unusual move in Japan where senior business positions are generally filled by men. “It is rare for a Japanese financial institution to give this type of promotion to a woman,” said Azuma Ohno at Credit Suisse in Tokyo.“It’s an impressive move.”


S&P 500 2011 Median Target – 1,535, Really?

Friday, March 4th, 2011

Investment bank earnings estimates are truly bullish for 2011.  Applying a 16x-18x multiple to these forward earnings brings you to S&P levels unseen since 2007.  Unfortunately, something not included in these estimates is that for every $10 crude oil increases, S&P earnings fall by $3.  This does not even factor in the fall in consumer confidence when citizens across the globe realize that they are soon going to pay $200 to fill up a mid-sized sedan, once QE3 is unveiled and Middle Eastern governments are overthrown once and for all.  After all this is done for, oil could easily reach $130+ on a supply disruption in Saudi Arabia.

Of course, BofA’s Bianco will not discuss this.  Neither will the analysts at Barclays, who just revised their S&P 500 earnings estimates up from 1,420 to 1,450.

Please view LA’s blog entry to see the S&P earning’s table below.

Predicted
Firm Strategist 2011 Close 2011 EPS RPF Model
Bank of America David Bianco 1,400 $93.00 1,535
Bank of Montreal Ben Joyce 1,300 $89.00 1,469
Barclays Barry Knapp 1,420 $91.00 1,502
Citigroup* Tobias Levkovich 1,300 $94.50 1,559
Credit Suisse Andrew Garthwaite 1,350 $91.00 1,502
Deutsche Bank Binky Chadha 1,550 $96.00 1,584
Goldman Sachs David Kostin 1,450 $94.00 1,551
HSBC Garry Evans 1,320
JPMorgan Thomas Lee 1,425 $94.00 1,551
Morgan Stanley**
Oppenheimer Brian Belski 1,325 $88.50 1,460
RBC Myles Zyblock $88.00 1,452
UBS Jonathan Golub 1,325 $93.00 1,535
Median 1,350 $93.00 1,535
Average 1,379 $92.00 1,518
High 1,550 $96.00 1,584
Low 1,300 $88.00 1,452

Most Common Face in the World – National Geographic

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

National Geographic Magazine released a video clip, below, showing the most “typical” human face on the planet as part of its series on the human race called “Population 7 billion.”

The researchers conclude that a male, 28-year-old Han Chinese man is the most typical person on the planet. There are 900 million of them.  No wonder I see so many on Wall Street.  The Chinese are showing prowess both at home and abroad!

The image above is a composite of nearly 200,000 photos of men who fit that description.

Don’t get used to the results, however. Within 20 years, the most typical person will reside in India.

A similar resource exists for the most common female faces in the world. According to UK Daily mail, these are the average faces of women from 24 different nations, all quite beautiful. Observations here include that Peruvians and Iranians have bigger mouths, Ethiopians and Samoans have curlier hair, and fringes seem to be big in Latvia and Poland.

Some anomalies can be explained by how the pictures were compiled. The prevalence of mousy hair is a result of blondeness being easily ‘diluted’.

South African Photographer Mike Mike – who inspired the images with a web project called The Face of Tomorrow compiling the faces of various cities – explains: ‘Blonde hair gets lost pretty quickly when you start averaging.

‘You’d need a population 75 per cent blonde to get it visibly remaining. You’d probably have to go to Iceland for that result.’ Please see their pictures below:

Check out our intensive investment banking, private equity, and sales & trading courses! The discount code Merger34299 will be activated until April 15, 2011. Questions? Feel free to e-mail thomas.r[at]leverageacademy.com with your inquiries or call our corporate line.

Lazard Operating Revenues Jump 67% Year over Year: Core Investment Banking Coming Back

Sunday, May 9th, 2010

Lazard, famed investment bank and legacy of Bruce Wasserstein recently reported earnings that blew investors away.  Operating revenues jumped 67% from one year earlier.  Lazard advises on mergers & acquisitions, restructurings, and to a lesser extent, capital raisings.  It operates from 40 cities across 25 countries throughout Europe, North America, Asia, Australia, and Central and South America, focusing on two business segments: Financial Advisory and Asset Management (explained below).

According to Bloomberg, “Lazard Ltd., the biggest non-bank merger adviser, rose in New York trading after posting adjusted earnings that beat analysts’ estimates on operating revenue that jumped 67 percent from a year earlier.

The loss for the first three months of 2010 was $33.5 million, or 38 cents a share, compared with a loss of $53.5 million, or 77 cents, in the same period a year earlier, the Hamilton, Bermuda-based company said today in a statement. Adjusted earnings were 46 cents a share, beating the 18-cent average estimate of 12 analysts in a Bloomberg survey.

Lazard’s revenue from advising on mergers and acquisitions climbed from a year earlier even as companies completed a lower value of deals in the quarter. Excluding special charges, the firm’s compensation ratio fell to 60 percent of revenue, compared with 75 percent in the first quarter of 2009.

“The report should give investors a booster shot of confidence on two important fronts,” Oppenheimer & Co. analyst Chris Kotowski said in a note to investors. “First, that the rebound in M&A activity is happening, albeit in fits and starts. Second, that the company is developing discipline around its compensation and other costs.”

Lazard rose 57 cents, or 1.5 percent, to $38.78 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading. The shares gained 28 percent last year after falling 27 percent in 2008.

Revenue Increase

Operating revenue rose 67 percent from a year earlier to a first-quarter record of $456.9 million. Operating revenue from financial-advisory services climbed to $269.1 million as fees from advising on both mergers and restructuring jumped more than 50 percent.

Revenue from merger and acquisition and strategic advisory climbed 53 percent from a year earlier to $147.6 million. That’s down 13 percent from the fourth quarter of 2009.

Asset management revenue climbed 78 percent from a year earlier to $183.7 million. Assets under management increased 4 percent to $135 billion from Dec. 31, with net inflows of $3 billion in the quarter.

“Both financial advisory and asset management had their best first quarters ever,” Chief Financial Officer Michael Castellano said in an interview. “We’re continuing to gain global market share in the M&A business.”

Compensation costs climbed 35 percent from a year earlier to $275.5 million. The firm also recorded a one-time $87.1 million expense tied to staff reductions.

‘Right Manpower Complement’

“Over the last two years, in addition to aggressively hiring senior bankers, we’ve also right-sized the firm in both asset management and the financial-advisory business, to make sure we have the right skill sets for the new world,” Castellano said. “I think we’ve now got the right manpower complement to be able to drive growth in both of the businesses.”

Kenneth Jacobs was named chief executive officer in November after the death of Bruce Wasserstein, the preeminent Wall Street dealmaker who took Lazard public in 2005. Jacobs, who has worked at the firm for 22 years, had served as deputy chairman and CEO of North American businesses since 2002, shortly after Wasserstein arrived.

Lazard said last month that Castellano will retire on March 31, 2011. He will be replaced by Matthieu Bucaille, who served as deputy chief executive officer of Lazard Freres Banque in Paris.

Financial Advice

Lazard has been using its restructuring-advisory business to counter weakness in mergers and acquisitions. It was the second-ranked adviser in 2009 bankruptcy liquidations, according to Bloomberg data, and advised debtors or creditors in the top 10 Chapter 11 bankruptcies in 2009.

Companies worldwide completed $358.9 billion of deals in the first quarter, down 25 percent from the same period in 2009 and 52 percent from the first quarter of 2008, data compiled by Bloomberg show.

Lazard was the seventh-ranked financial adviser on announced deals and 12th-ranked on completed takeovers in the first quarter. The firm advised on completed deals totaling more than $33.9 billion, including Kraft Foods Inc.’s acquisition of Cadbury PLC.

Lazard employees own more than a quarter of the firm, excluding the estate of Wasserstein. Because the stakes owned by employees can be converted into common stock, the company reports earnings as though the stakes were fully exchanged instead of treating them as minority interest.

Evercore Partners Inc., the investment bank founded by former U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman, reported earnings last week that beat analysts’ estimates as advisory revenue climbed from a year ago.

Lazard Business Breakdown

Financial Advisory

The Company offers corporate, partnership, institutional, government and individual clients across the globe an array of financial advisory services regarding mergers and acquisitions (M&A), and other strategic matters, restructurings, capital structure, capital raising and various other corporate finance matters. During the year ended December 31, 2009, the Financial Advisory segment accounted for approximately 65% of its consolidated net revenue. It has operations in United States, United Kingdom, France, Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Dubai, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Panama, Peru, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Uruguay and mainland China.

The Company advises clients on a range of strategic and financial issues. When it advises companies in the potential acquisition of another company, business or certain assets, its services include evaluating potential acquisition targets, providing valuation analyses, evaluating and proposing financial and strategic alternatives and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. It also may advise as to the timing, structure, financing and pricing of a proposed acquisition and assist in negotiating and closing the acquisition. In addition, the Company may assist in executing an acquisition by acting as a dealer-manager in transactions structured as a tender or exchange offer. When the Company advises clients that are contemplating the sale of certain businesses, assets or their entire company, its services include advising on the appropriate sales process for the situation, valuation issues, assisting in preparing an offering circular or other appropriate sales materials and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. It also identifies and contacts selected qualified acquirors, and assists in negotiating and closing the proposed sale. It also advises its clients regarding financial and strategic alternatives to a sale, including recapitalizations, spin-offs, carve-outs, split-offs and tracking stocks.

For companies in financial distress, the Company’s services may include reviewing and analyzing the business, operations, properties, financial condition and prospects of the company, evaluating debt capacity, assisting in the determination of an appropriate capital structure and evaluating and recommending financial and strategic alternatives, including providing advice on dividend policy. It may also provide financial advice and assistance in developing and seeking approval of a restructuring or reorganization plan, which may include a plan of reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code or other similar court administered processes in non-United States jurisdictions.

When the Company assists clients in raising private or public market financing, its services include originating and executing private placements of equity, debt and related securities, assisting clients in connection with securing, refinancing or restructuring bank loans, originating public underwritings of equity, debt and convertible securities and originating and executing private placements of partnership and similar interests in alternative investment funds, such as leveraged buyout, mezzanine or real estate focused funds. In addition, it may advise on capital structure and assist in long-range capital planning and rating agency relationships.

Asset Management

The Company’s Asset Management business provides investment management and advisory services to institutional clients, financial intermediaries, private clients and investment vehicles around the world. As of December 31, 2009, total assets under management (AUM) were $129.5 billion, of which approximately 82% was invested in equities, 14% in fixed income, 3% in alternative investments and 1% in private equity funds. During 2009, approximately 36% of its AUM was invested in international investment strategies, 46% was invested in global investment strategies and 18% was invested in United States investment strategies. As of December 31, 2009, approximately 89% of its AUM was managed on behalf of institutional clients, including corporations, labor unions, public pension funds, insurance companies and banks, and through sub-advisory relationships, mutual fund sponsors, broker-dealers and registered advisors, and approximately 11% of its AUM, as of December 31, 2009, was managed on behalf of individual client relationships, which are principally with family offices and high-net worth individuals.

The Company competes with Bank of America, Citigroup, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs & Co., JPMorgan Chase, Mediobanca, Morgan Stanley, Rothschild, UBS, The Blackstone Group, Evercore Partners, Moelis & Co., Greenhill & Co., Alliance Bernstein, AMVESCAP, Brandes Investment Partners, Capital Management & Research, Fidelity, Lord Abbett, Aberdeen and Schroders.

Phillips Van Heusen Buys Tommy Hilfiger for $3 billion in Cash & Stock Deal, Securing Great Returns for Apax Private Equity

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

PVH’s acquisition of Tommy Hilfiger is a great transaction for a solid brand at 8x trailing EBITDA.  Apax, the owner of Tommy Hilfiger since its $1.6 billion buyout in 2006 will make 4.5x on its investment, one of the most successful private equity exits seen this year, especially for a company purchased in 2006.

According to Ms. Skariachan of Reuters, Phillips-Van Heusen (PVH.N), owner of the Calvin Klein label, agreed to buy fashion brand Tommy Hilfiger from London-based Apax Partners APAX.UL in a $3 billion cash-and-stock deal to boost its presence in Europe and Asia.

The deal would make Phillips-Van Heusen one of the largest suppliers of menswear to U.S. department stores, and will keep Hilfiger founder Tommy Hilfiger in his role as principal designer for the clothing line.

It also will add yet another high-profile name to PVH’s lineup, home to Izod and Calvin Klein. PVH also distributes menswear under labels such as Kenneth Cole New York, Michael Kors, Donald Trump and DKNY.

News of the deal boosted Phillips-Van Heusen’s shares about 10 percent, although both Moody’s Investors Service and Standard & Poor’s said they may cut their ratings on the company, citing the debt it will take on to fund the deal.

The deal would mark an end to London-based private equity firm Apax’s plans for an initial public offering for the iconic brand which it had bought in 2006 for $1.6 billion.

Private equity firms have been increasingly able to exit investments as the economy and markets have stabilized. Taking companies public has been more problematic.

Apax made 4.5 times its investment on the deal and will hold about 7 percent of the stock in PVH after the deal, a source familiar with the situation said.

“The deal certainly makes sense and that can be seen from PVH’s share price. A lot of people out there see that although it is quite a costly acquisition, they are still getting it at quite a low price,” IBISWorld analyst Toon van Beeck said.

At an estimated valuation of 8 times trailing earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, “the price seems reasonable and the deal makes strategic sense to us,” Morningstar said in a research note for investors.

Tommy Hilfiger has spent the last few years trying to undo the damage from shifting its focus to a more mainstream group of buyers. It suffered years of sales declines after its logo-heavy designs helped make it a staple of urban streetwear, but alienated more affluent customers. Now, the company is expanding more quickly abroad than in the United States.

“It’s an opportunity to really revamp Tommy Hilfiger, which was such an iconic brand in the 90s and has somewhat died,” van Beeck said.

“I don’t think Apax Partners did enough with the brand, but Van Heusen is more familiar with menswear,” said Donna Reamy, associate professor at the department of fashion design and merchandising at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond.

Hilfiger CEO Fred Gehring said the PVH deal makes sense despite Apax’s earlier plans to take Hilfiger public.

“When you have a strategic sale, the norm often is you also lose a little bit of your identity in the process. PVH on the other hand in the transaction with Calvin Klein seven years ago has demonstrated how it can be done differently,” Gehring told Reuters in an interview.

Gehring will remain as chief executive, join the PVH board and take on international operations for PVH.

PVH expects the deal to boost earnings by 20 cents to 25 cents a share, excluding items, in the current fiscal year.

It also said the deal would add 75 cents a share to $1 a share in the next fiscal year, ending January 29, 2012.

Private investment firm Blue Harbour Group, which owns about 1.5 million Phillips-Van Heusen shares, said it was “very supportive” of the deal.

There is “potential for the stock to move further up from the move we’ve seen today,” said Michael James, a senior trader at Wedbush Morgan in Los Angeles.

FAIR PRICE

Phillips-Van Heusen will pay $2.6 billion in cash and $380 million in common stock for Tommy Hilfiger.

Phillips-Van Heusen expects to use $3.05 billion in debt, $385 million in cash, $200 million in preferred stock and $200 million from a common stock offering to finance the deal and refinance other debt.

The company is paying “a very fair price for such a powerful brand,” PVH Chief Executive Emanuel Chirico told Reuters in an interview. It expects $300 million in annual cash flow, and plans to pay off $200 million in debt in 2011.

The deal would not alter PVH’s relationships with its other brands and licenses, he said.

The company sees annual cost savings of $40 million from the deal and expects to close it in the second quarter.

According to Bloomberg, “the purchase will accelerate revenue growth  to as much as 8 percent, helped by Amsterdam-based Tommy Hilfiger’s European operations, Phillips-Van Heusen Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Emanuel Chirico, 52, said in an interview today. About two-thirds of Tommy Hilfiger’s revenue comes from outside the U.S. The combined company will have annual sales of $4.6 billion.

“PVH could extend some of their brands into Europe,” Chris Kim, an analyst at JPMorgan Chase & Co. in New York, said in a telephone interview. “In the domestic market, PVH has better expertise in the mass channel and the department-store sphere, and would help them manage better the Tommy Hilfiger brand.”

Adds to Earnings

The proposed acquisition is the biggest announced by a U.S. clothing retailer or manufacturer in the past 10 years, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. It’s also the eighth- biggest announced by any U.S. company this year, the data show.

Tommy Hilfiger will add as much as 25 cents a share to Phillips-Van Heusen’s 2010 earnings and as much as $1 next year, excluding one-time costs to finance the deal and integrate the companies, according to the statement. Phillips-Van Heusen’s revenue grew 2.8 percent in the year ended Feb. 1, 2009.

Phillips-Van Heusen rose $4.66, or 9.8 percent, to $52.40 at 4:15 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, the biggest gain in almost a year. The shares have risen 29 percent this year, giving the company a market value of about $2.7 billion, less than what it’s paying for Tommy Hilfiger.

Phillips-Van Heusen plans to sell its Arrow and Izod brands in Europe, probably through department stores, Chirico and Tommy Hilfiger CEO Fred Gehring said in the interview today. The company will expand existing Tommy Hilfiger categories at Macy’s Inc. — the exclusive department-store seller of Tommy Hilfiger sportswear — and add new ones, the executives said.

Macy’s Sales

Phillips-Van Heusen sells $300 million of its goods at Macy’s, the second-largest U.S. department-store chain, and Tommy Hilfiger sells $200 million, Chirico said.

“The Tommy acquisition really fits all our strategic targets for an acquisition,” Chirico said. “It’s a very strong global brand, with a strong international platform, that will be immediately accretive to earnings.”

Tommy Hilfiger first sold shares in 1992 and increased annual revenue to almost $2 billion in 2000 after its American- themed red-white-and-blue-splashed clothing became popular internationally. It now has 1,000 namesake stores worldwide.

The company was started in 1985 by its Elmira, New York- born namesake designer. Hilfiger, who opened a boutique while still a high-school student, will remain the principal designer, Phillips-Van Heusen said. Gehring will stay on as Tommy Hilfiger chief executive officer.

Deal Financing

Phillips-Van Heusen plans to sell shares worth $200 million to help pay for the takeover, issuing about 8.7 million, or 13 percent of its outstanding stock, to Apax and other Tommy Hilfiger shareholders. The company said it plans to get $2.45 billion of senior secured debt, including undrawn revolving credit of $450 million, $600 million of senior unsecured notes and $200 million in preferred stock, and about $385 million of cash to fund the deal and refinance $300 million of bonds.

Barclays Capital and Deutsche Bank AG are global debt coordinators for the transactions, according to the statement.

Phillips-Van Heusen’s bid values Tommy Hilfiger at 1.3 times sales and 10.7 times earnings before interest and taxes, known as Ebit. Tommy Hilfiger revenue in the year ending March 31 may total $2.25 billion, about 34 percent of that in U.S. markets, and Ebit will come in at $280 million, according to the statement.

Peter J. Solomon Co is the lead financial adviser to PVH. Barclays Capital, Deutsche Bank, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, and RBC Capital Markets also acted as financial advisers and will arrange financing for the deal.

Credit Suisse acted as lead financial adviser to the Tommy Hilfiger Group and as sole adviser to Apax Partners.”

Credit Suisse Junk Bonuses Turn Into $5B

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

All of you probably remember last year how Credit Suisse did something “unthinkable” by giving bonuses in the form of CDOs and ABS.  Now it seems that CS bankers were some of the most highly compensated during the recession!

Credit Suisse sign

Bankers’ ‘junk’ bonuses turn into $5bn

By Alex Ritson
Business reporter, BBC World Service

Bonuses made up of so-called toxic debt and given to bankers at Credit Suisse as a punishment for poor investments, have soared in value.

Their bonus pool, made up financial products originally thought to be worthless, is now worth $5bn (£3.2bn).

The bank lost $7bn last year, in part due to the investment decisions of some of its best-paid staff.

The toxic debt bonuses had been described as a way of giving the bankers to taste of their own medicine.

But it has now emerged the value of the toxic bonus pool has climbed by 72% – far outperforming many safer investments.

Well-deserved?

The money had been put into complicated financial products linked to the risky commercial debt secured on among other things, a Japanese shopping centre, an American supermarket chain and other commercial property that had plunged in value.

At the height of the financial crisis, many people thought these investments were worthless. To Credit Suisse, it seemed right to share them out as annual bonuses among the people who had apparently got things so wrong.

But as confidence has returned to the market – it has become clear that the toxic asset pool wasn’t nearly as toxic it had been thought.

The toxic bonus fund has soared in value by 72%. That compares with a 60% rise in the value of Credit Suisse shares over the same period – or a mere 19% rise in the main US share index the Dow Jones.

The bankers may well feel they have earned the money though.

Credit Suisse is safely back in profit – and unlike its rivals at UBS, Credit Suisse did not take a bail-out from the Swiss Government.

~Sourced by I.S.

Comprehensive List of Investment Banks

Sunday, November 8th, 2009

Wall Street

A.G. Edwards Keefe, Bruyette & Woods
ABN Amro KeyCorp
Allen & Company Kidder, Peabody & Co.
Allegiance Capital Corporation KPMG Corporate Finance
AllianceBernstein Kleinwort Benson
Allianz Kuhn, Loeb & Co.
Alpha Omega Capital Partners L.F. Rothschild
Ambrian Ladenburg Thalmann
Babcock & Brown Lazard
Baird Lazard Capital Markets
Bank of America Merrill Lynch Lee, Higginson & Co.
Bank of NY Mellon Leerink Swann
Bank of Nova Scotia Lighthouse Capital Advisors
Bank Leumi USA Lincoln International
Barclays Lloyds TSB Group plc
BB&T Corp. M&T Bank
BCC Capital Partners Macquarie Bank
Bengur Bryan & Co. McColl Partners
Blackstone Group McGladrey Capital Markets
BMO Miller Buckfire
BNP Paribas Moelis & Co.
Boenning & Scattergood Mizuho Financial Group
Breckenridge Group Monte dei Paschi di Siena
Brisbane Capital Montgomery & Co.
Broadpoint Securities Montgomery Securities
Brookwood Associates Morgan Grenfell
Brown Brothers Harriman Morgan Joseph & Co.
Brown Gibbons Lang & Co. Morgan Keegan
Brown, Shipley & Co. Morgan Stanley
C.V. Lemmon & Co. Mosaic Capital
C.E. Unterberg, Towbin N M Rothschild & Sons
Calyon National City Corp.
Caymus Partners Needham & Company
Canaccord Adams Neuberger Berman, LLC
Cantor Fitzgerald Newbury Piret
Caris & Company Newsouth Capital Management inc.
Carnegie, Wylie & Company NIBC
Cascadia Corp. Noble Bank
CIBC Nomura
Citigroup Oppenheimer
Close Brothers Group P&M Corporate Finance
Comerica Park Lane
Commodities Corporation Penn Capital Group
Cowen Group, Inc. Perella Weinberg Partners
Credit Suisse Peter J. Solomon Company
Curtis Financial Group Petrie Parkman & Co.
D.A. Davidson & Co. Piper Jaffray
Deka Bank PNC Financial Services
Deloitte & Touche Corporate Finance Prarie Capital Advisors
Deutsche Bank Provident Capital Advisors
Dominion Partners Provident Healthcare Partners
Dresdner Kleinwort Prudential Securities
Duff & Phelps Putnam Lovell
E. F. Hutton Rabobank
Edgeview Partners Regions Financial Services
Evercore Partners Raymond James
Fifth Third Bancorp. Robert Fleming & Co.
Financo, Inc. Robert W. Baird & Company
First Horizon National Corp. Robertson & Foley
Focus Enterprises Robertson, Stephens
Fortis Bank Royal Bank of Canada
Fox-Pitt, Kelton Royal Bank of Scotland
Friedman Billings Ramsey Rutberg & Co.
G.H. Walker & Co. Ryan Beck & Co.
Gemini Partners Sagent Advisors
Genuity Capital Markets Salman Partners Inc.
Gerard Klauer Mattison Salomon Brothers
Goldman Sachs Sandler O’Neill + Partners
Grace Matthews Saxo Bank
Greenhill & Company Schroders
Greif & Co. Scotia Bank
Growth Capital Partners Shoreline Partners
Grupo Santander Societe Generale
GulfStar Group Soundview Technology Group
GW Equity SPP Capital Partners
H. B. Hollins & Co. Stephens Inc.
Harpeth Capital Stifel Nicolaus
Halsey, Stuart & Co. St. Charles Capital
Hambrecht & Quist SunTrust Banks, Inc.
Hambros Bank Susquehanna International Group, LLP (SIG)
Harris Williams & Company SVB Alliant
Harris, Forbes & Co. T. Rowe Price
Headwaters MB TD Securities
Heritage Capital Group The DAK Group
Herrera Partners ThinkEquity Partners, LLC
Hilco Corporate Finance, LLC ThinkPanmure LLC
Houlihan Lokey Howard & Zukin Thomas Weisel Partners
HSBC Toronto-Dominion Bank
Hyde Park Capital Advisors Transparent Value
Imperial Capital, LLC Trenwith Securities
ING Group Triangle Capital Partners
Investec TSG Partners, LLC
Investment Technology Group UBS AG
Ironwood Capital Unicredit
J. & W. Seligman & Co. Union Bank of California
Janes Capital Partners Vercore
Janney Montgomery Scott Verdant Partners
Jefferies & Co. Webster Financial Corp.
JMP Securities Wells Fargo
Jordan, Knauff & Company White Weld & Co.
JPMorgan Chase William Blair & Company
Kaupthing Bank WIT Capital
KBC Bank WR Hambrecht+ Co