Posts Tagged ‘Leveraged Buyout’

HCA IPO Rises 4% on Day Dow Falls 228 Points

Friday, March 11th, 2011
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HCA Holdings rose about 4.0% in its first day of trading.  This was very impressive, considering the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 228 points in the same day (3/10/11).  The Dow fell in response to increasing jobless claims, a larger U.S. trade deficit, a larger Chinese trade deficit, and a lower GDP revision in Japan on 3/9/11.  Luckily, HCA was unaffected, which reflects both the strength of the company and its balance sheet.  HCA represents such a large share of the U.S. hospital industry, that institutional money managers probably could not refuse to purchase the security for their portfolios.  HCA’s public competitors include CYH – Community Health Systems and THC – Tenet Healthcare Corp.

According to Bloomberg, “HCA Holdings Inc., the largest publicly traded hospital chain in the U.S., rose 3.9 percent on its first day of trading after completing a record $3.79 billion, private equity-backed initial public offering.

Nashville, Tennessee-based HCA increased $1.15 to $31.15 at 1:16 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, even as rising U.S. jobless claims drove the Dow Jones Industrial Index down 137 points. HCA’s offering sold more than 126 million shares at $30 each, the top of the proposed price range, the company said yesterday in a statement.

The IPO’s performance on a day when the market is falling reflects both the strength of HCA’s balance sheet and the momentum in favor of private equity-backed deals being brought to market, said Josef Schuster, founder of IPOX Schuster LLC in Chicago. There’s “plenty of liquidity available” for large U.S. deals like this one, he said.

“The deal underlines the level of confidence among large- cap managers about these type of private equity deals and the for-profit hospital space,” Schuster said in a telephone interview today. “Even with no dividend, investors like the level of cash with this company.”

For-profit hospitals will benefit as last year’s U.S. health overhaul forces consolidation and cost cutting that may leave non-profit competitors at a disadvantage, said Les Funtleyder, an analyst at Miller Tabak & Co. in New York. Investors are also expecting HCA to be added to stock-trading indexes and buying ahead of that, he said.

Blue-Chip Name

“People look at HCA as a blue-chip name in a space they want to get involved in,” said Mark Bronzo, who helps manage $25 billion at Security Global Investors in Irvington, New York, in a telephone interview today. “There just aren’t a lot of names to choose from there.”

For-profit hospital chains such as HCA depend more on commercial payers and less on government beneficiaries than do nonprofits, which have already seen their revenue reduced by government cutbacks, particularly in Medicaid.

HCA competitors among for-profit hospitals include Community Health Systems Inc. (CYH) in Franklin, Tennessee, and Tenet Healthcare Corp. (THC) in Dallas.

HCA’s offering exceeded the Feb. 10 initial stock sale by Houston-based energy-pipeline company Kinder Morgan Inc., which raised $3.3 billion. Private equity-backed IPOs in the U.S. have gotten a boost this year as the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index rallied to the highest level since June 2008, raising investors’ interest in companies acquired through debt-fueled takeovers.

‘Warmer Climate’

“We have a market that’s more willing to take on risk,” said Alan Gayle, senior investment strategist at RidgeWorth Capital Management in Richmond, Virginia, which oversees $52.5 billion. “This is a much better, much warmer climate for this type of offering.”

The underwriters may exercise an overallotment option to buy as many as 18.9 million additional shares within 30 days, the company said. HCA sold 87.7 million shares, while existing investors sold 38.5 million.

Companies owned by private equity investors have accounted for 80 percent of the funds raised in U.S. IPOs since the beginning of the year, and the shares have gained 10 percent on average through yesterday, compared with 4.8 percent for companies not owned by leveraged buyout firms, Bloomberg data show.

KKR and Bain

KKR & Co., Bain Capital LLC, Bank of America Corp. (BAC) and other owners invested about $5 billion in equity in the $33 billion takeover of HCA. Including debt, it was the largest leveraged buyout at the time.

In acquiring HCA, KKR and Bain chose a company with steady cash flow and a business that’s protected to a large extent from swings in the economy. Cash flow from operations was $3.16 billion in the year before the 2006 buyout, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. As of Dec. 31, 2010, that number was little changed at $3.09 billion.

The company offered as many as 124 million shares at $27 to $30 apiece, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Charlotte, North Carolina-based Bank of America and Citigroup Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. of New York led HCA’s sale. HCA said it will use the proceeds to repay debt.”

The following links will take you to previous articles we wrote on HCA:

http://leverageacademy.com/blog/2010/04/11/hca-could-have-3-billion-ipo-4-years-after-kkr-bain-buyout/

http://leverageacademy.com/blog/2011/03/04/2310/ – KKR & Bain to IPO HCA at $30/share

Check out our intensive investment banking, private equity, and sales & trading courses! The discount code Merger34299 will be activated until April 15, 2011. Questions? Feel free to e-mail thomas.r[at]leverageacademy.com with your inquiries or call our corporate line.


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HCA Could Have $3 Billion IPO, 4 Years After KKR & Bain Buyout

Sunday, April 11th, 2010
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Most recent bond prospectus for HCA…great read.

HCA Prospectus

Short video clip describing HCA IPO and roadshow process.

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Four years after its buyout, HCA, the largest hospital chain in the United States is preparing for an IPO that could raise as much as $3 billion for KKR and its investors.  HCA has over 160 hospitals and 105 outpatient-surgery clinics in 20 states and England.  The IPO would help the firm pay down some of its $26 billion in debt.  The company is very well positioned to benefit from health care reform.  According to Analysts, this specific IPO would be the largest in the U.S. since March 2008, when Visa Inc. raised almost $20 billion…A takeover of a public company of more than $6 billion including debt hasn’t been announced since 2007.  HCA has fared much better than other mega-buyouts from 2006/2007, and is only levered at 4.8x trailing EBITDA.

According to Bloomberg, “HCA Inc., the hospital chain bought four years ago in a $33 billion leveraged buyout led by KKR & Co. and Bain Capital LLC, is preparing an initial public offering that may raise $3 billion, said two people with knowledge of the matter.

HCA plans to interview banks to underwrite the sale in the coming weeks, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the information isn’t public. The sale, slated for this year, may fetch $2.5 billion to $3 billion, the people said. HCA’s owners, which include Bank of America Corp. and Tennessee’s Frist family, may seek $4 billion, said another person familiar with the plans.

The stock offering would be the biggest U.S. IPO in two years and help HCA pay off debt, the people said. The hospital operator may profit from the health-care legislation President Barack Obama signed into law on March 23 that provides for coverage for millions of uninsured patients, said Sheryl Skolnick, an analyst at CRT Capital Group LLC in Stamford, Connecticut.

HCA is “extremely well-positioned to benefit from health reform because their hospitals tend to be concentrated in significant markets” including Denver, Dallas, Houston, Kansas City, Missouri, and Salt Lake City, Skolnick said yesterday in a telephone interview. “Health reform was very important to this decision.”

Kristi Huller, a spokeswoman for KKR, and Alex Stanton, a Bain spokesman, declined to comment, as did Jerry Dubrowski, a Bank of America spokesman. Ed Fishbough, a spokesman for HCA, didn’t immediately respond to a phone call and e-mail seeking comment.

Buyout Surge

Private-equity firms spent $2 trillion, most of it borrowed, to buy companies ranging from Hilton Hotels Corp. to Clear Channel Communications Inc. in the leveraged-buyout boom that ended in 2007 and are now seeking to cut that debt before it matures.

U.S. IPO investors have been leery of companies backed by private equity this year. In the biggest offering so far, Bain’s Sensata Technologies Holding NV sold $569 million of shares last month at the low end of its estimated price range. In February, Blackstone Group LP’s Graham Packaging Co. and CCMP Capital Advisors LLC’s Generac Holdings Inc. were forced to cut the size of their offerings.

HCA may file for the IPO with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as early as next month, said one of the people.

The IPO would be the largest in the U.S. since March 2008, when Visa Inc. raised almost $20 billion. HCA would be the biggest IPO of a private-equity backed company in the U.S. since at least 2000, according to Greenwich, Connecticut-based Renaissance Capital LLC, which has followed IPOs since 1991.

Debt Load

HCA’s owners put up about $5.3 billion to buy the company, according to a regulatory filing, funding the rest with loans from banks including Bank of America, Merrill Lynch & Co., JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Citigroup Inc. The IPO would lower HCA’s debt load rather than allowing owners to reduce their stakes, said the people.

The hospital chain’s purchase in 2006 shattered the record for the largest leveraged buyout, held since 1989 by KKR’s acquisition of RJR Nabisco Inc. HCA’s record was eclipsed by Blackstone’s acquisition of Equity Office Properties Trust and again by the 2007 takeover of Energy Future Holdings Corp., by KKR and TPG Inc., for $43 billion including debt.

Later that year, the global credit contraction cut off the supply of loans necessary to arrange the largest LBOs. A takeover of a public company of more than $6 billion including debt hasn’t been announced since 2007.

$25.7 Billion Debt

HCA, the largest U.S. hospital operator, had about $25.7 billion of debt as of Dec. 31, about 4.8 times its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, even before HCA’s owners tapped credit lines in January to pay themselves a $1.75 billion dividend. Tenet Healthcare Corp.’s ratio was 4.4 and LifePoint Hospitals Inc.’s was 2.85 at year- end, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Health-care companies have fared better than the average private-equity investment during the economic decline. KKR said in February that its holding in the company had gained as much as 90 percent in value as of Dec. 31, while stakes in Energy Future Holdings Corp. and First Data Corp. were worth less than their initial cost.

Hospitals will probably be “net winners” in the health- care legislation, said Adam Feinstein, a New York-based analyst at Barclays Capital, in a March 26 note to investors. HCA, Dallas-based Tenet and Brentwood, Tennessee-based LifePoint may gain because the legislation will reduce hospitals’ losses from providing charity care to the poor and uncollectible bills.

Frist Family

HCA has 163 hospitals and 105 outpatient-surgery clinics in 20 states and England, according to the company’s Web site.

The company was founded in 1968, when Nashville physician Thomas Frist Sr., and his son, Thomas Frist Jr., and Jack Massey built a hospital there and formed Hospital Corp. of America. By 1987, the company had grown to operate 463 hospitals, according to the company’s Web site. Thomas Frist Sr. is also the father of Bill Frist, a physician and the former Senate majority leader.

HCA went private in a $5.1 billion leveraged buyout in 1989, then went public again in 1992, according to the company Web site. In 1994, HCA merged with Louisville, Kentucky-based Columbia Hospital Corp. In the mid-1990s the company, then called Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp., operated 350 hospitals, 145 outpatient clinics and 550 home-care agencies, according to the company.

Overbilling Settlement

In December 2000, HCA agreed to pay $840 million in criminal and civil penalties to settle U.S. claims that it overbilled states and the federal government for health-care costs. It was the largest government fraud settlement in U.S. history at the time, according to a U.S. Justice Department news release on Dec. 14, 2000.

A credit-market rally has helped HCA extend maturities on some of its debt. HCA has sold $4.46 billion of bonds since February 2009 in a bid to repay bank debt and delay maturities, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The company still has about $11 billion coming due over the next three years, according to Bloomberg data. It is also negotiating with lenders to amend the terms of a bank loan.

HCA offered earlier this month to pay an increased interest rate to lengthen maturities on $1 billion of bank debt, according to two people familiar with the matter. The amendment would allow HCA to move part of the money due under its term loan B to 2017 from 2013. Even after the refinancing and debt pay downs, the company will still have to access the “capital markets to address remaining maturities,” said Moody’s Investors Service Inc. in a note last month.

“It will be difficult for the company to meaningfully reduce the amount of debt outstanding through operations due to limited free cash flow generation,” Moody’s said.”

Here is an article from 4 years ago by the NY Times describing the mega-buyout:

“HCA, the nation’s largest for-profit hospital operator, said today that it had agreed to be acquired by consortium of private investors for about $21 billion. The investors will also take on about $11.7 billion of HCA’s debt.
Skip to next paragraph

The overall deal, which the company valued at about $33 billion, would rank as the largest leveraged buyout in history, eclipsing the $31 billion takeover of RJR Nabisco in 1989 by Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Company.

The group of buyers is led by the family of Senator Bill Frist, the Senate majority leader. His father, Thomas Frist Sr., and his brother, Thomas F. Frist Jr., founded HCA.

The other investors are Bain Capital, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and the private equity arm of Merrill Lynch.

The deal appears to be driven by trends both on Wall Street and in the health care industry. For one thing, the private equity business — in which investment companies pool capital from investors in order to buy companies and then resell them or take them public — is swimming in cash. And private equity firms are eager to invest in a company like HCA, which generates a lot of revenue and, judging by its stock price, is seen as undervalued by investors.

Like many other for-profit hospital companies, HCA has seen its stock perform poorly in recent years. The whole industry has struggled with increasing amounts of bad debt, as more people fail to pay their bills because they do not have sufficient health insurance or any coverage.

Separately, various private equity firms have made a number of huge deals recently: Univision for $12.3 billion in June; $22 billion for Kinder Morgan in May; General Motors’ finance unit, GMAC, for as much as $14 billion in April.

Earlier this month, the Blackstone Group said it had lined up $15.6 billion in commitments for its latest buyout pool, forming the world’s largest private equity fund.

HCA was taken private once before, in the late 1980’s by the company’s management, which at the time thought it was undervalued. The move turned out to be a success, and HCA went public again a few years later.

Today’s deal promises to generate large fees for Wall Street bankers and lawyers, who have been toiling away on the transaction for months. Credit Suisse, Morgan Stanley and Shearman & Sterling are advising HCA; Merrill, Bank of America Corporation, Citigroup Inc., J. P. Morgan Chase and Simpson Thacher & Bartlett are financing and advising the buying group.

HCA is the nation’s largest for-profit hospital chain, with 2005 revenues of roughly $25 billion. Based in Nashville, Tenn., the company operates about 180 hospitals and nearly 100 surgery centers.

After merging with Columbia Hospital Corporation in 1994, HCA became the subject of a sweeping federal Medicare fraud investigation; it agreed to pay $1.7 billion to settle the matter. Thomas Frist Jr., who had left HCA’s management before the fraud charges arose, eventually returned as chief executive in 1997. He stepped down as chairman in 2002, but he remains on the company’s board of directors.

Senator Frist’s ties to the company have drawn criticism over the years, as he has been active in the Senate on a variety of health-care initiatives that have the potential to affect the large hospital company. Last fall, the Securities and Exchange Commission began an investigation into his decision to sell stock, once estimated to be worth more than $10 million, which was held in a trust.

Mr. Frist sold the stock in June 2005, just as the price of HCA stock peaked and shortly before it fell the following month; the sale was disclosed in September. He has said that the timing of the sale was a coincidence, the result of a decision to divest his holdings in the company, and that he is cooperating with the investigation.

Under the terms of today’s deal, the consortium of investors would pay $51 a share for HCA’s outstanding common stock, roughly 15 percent more than the company’s trading price early last week, when word spread that the negotiations had faltered. Today, HCA’s stock rose $1.61, or 3.4 percent, to close at $49.48 on the New York Stock Exchange.

The investor consortium is expected to borrow about $15 billion to finance the deal. But with the high-yield bond market tightening, raising that amount could be a challenge.

There is also the possibility that another group could emerge with a rival offer. HCA has included a provision in its deal with the investor consortium that allows it to actively seek a higher offer. Firms like the Blackstone Group and the Apollo Group, as well as rival hospital operators, could try to bid.”

Check out our intensive investment banking, private equity, and sales & trading courses! The discount code Merger34299 will be activated until April 15, 2011. Questions? Feel free to e-mail thomas.r[at]leverageacademy.com with your inquiries or call our corporate line.


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Private Equity Firms Look for Retail & Consumer Buyouts in U.S. and Abroad

Thursday, March 11th, 2010
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As pricing for junk bonds and leveraged loans falls, more private equity firms are looking at U.S. and emerging market retail opportunities for buyouts.  T.H. Lee Partners just purchased CKE restaurants in February and Indian and Brazilian buyouts have been closing recently as well.  As the rest of the world grows faster than the U.S. and Europe, there will be more and more buyouts overseas.

According to Mr. Kelly and Ms. Coleman of Bloomberg, private-equity firms looking to buy retail and consumer companies said they’re now able to finance deals and pay reasonable prices after the credit crisis and global recession triggered a buyout slump.

“It feels like it’s a little bit of Goldilocks now,” Alex Pellegrini, a New York-based partner with Apax Partners LLP, said today. “It feels just right.”

Buyout managers are getting back to business after the global credit crisis that began in 2007 froze them out of buying companies or selling what they owned. About $12.9 billion worth of private-equity deals have been announced in the past three months, compared with $2.5 billion in the same period a year earlier, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

“The last couple months would suggest that people are getting active again,” said John Howard, chief executive officer of New York-based Irving Place Capital Management LP, noting his firm hasn’t made a retail investment in four years. “We’re seeing more real opportunities.”

Financing from Wall Street banks is returning for some deals after financial institutions suffered losses of $1.7 trillion since the onset of the credit crisis. Howard said deals require investors to contribute more of their own cash and less borrowed money, which means he and other managers are most interested in targets they think will boost sales and profits.

U.S. comparable-stores sales climbed 4.1 percent in February, topping the 3 percent growth estimate by researcher Retail Metrics. It was the sixth-straight monthly gain and the biggest in more than two years.

‘Quality Companies’

A stabilizing economy is helping broaden the number of potential targets beyond distressed companies that had no choice but to sell during the recession, said David Oddi, a co-founder of New York-based Goode Partners LLC.

“Over the past couple years, the best businesses have had the luxury of sitting on the sidelines,” Oddi said. “What we’re seeing now is more of the quality companies return to the market.”

The private-equity executives spoke on a panel moderated by Les Berglass, founder of executive-search firm Berglass + Associates, at Bloomberg’s headquarters in New York.

Thomas H. Lee Partners LP agreed last month to buy CKE Restaurants Inc., the owner of Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s fast-food chains, for about $619 million cash and assuming about $309 million in debt. CVC Capital Partners agreed to buy the retail unit of PT Matahari Putra Prima for 7.2 trillion rupiah ($772 million) in January.

Carlyle Group, the world’s second-biggest private-equity company, is among the firms looking beyond the U.S. for deals, said Sandra Horbach, who runs the Washington-based firm’s consumer and retail group from New York.

Dunkin’ Donuts

“There are certainly some countries today that have more robust growth than we’re seeing here in the United States,” Horbach said, noting the firm’s purchase of Brazilian tour operator CVC Brasil Operadora e Agencia de Viagens SA this year.

Carlyle also is poised to take advantage of stabilized capital markets to sell some of its investments, Horbach said. The firm is among the owners of Dunkin’ Brands, the operator of the Dunkin’ Donuts and Baskin Robbins chains, which is a likely candidate for an initial public offering, Horbach said.

“That’s a company that we know will go public at a very attractive valuation and it’s just a question of timing,” she said.

Buyout-backed companies including Dollar General Corp., owned by KKR & Co., have successfully gone public. Shares of the Goodlettsville, Tennessee-based discount retailer have gained almost 20 percent since they were sold in an IPO in November.

Strategic Acquirers

Private-equity firms may more often reap profits from consumer-focused investments by selling them to other investors or to larger companies, so-called strategic acquirers, rather than selling them to the public, Horbach said.

Shifting out of a defensive mode into a mindset of growing, and eventually selling companies, has private-equity owners looking to hire top executives. Berglass, the executive-search executive, said his business has increased 50 percent since last June. It’s a signal that things are picking up, he said.

“Every time the economy has dipped, we find ourselves the first ones coming back,” Berglass said.

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Skillsoft LBO

Sunday, February 14th, 2010
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skilsoft-logo

According to NewsCenter, “E-learning software maker SkillSoft Plc based in Ireland said it agreed to be acquired by a consortium of private-equity firms for about USD 1.1 billion, an offer that investors think undervalues the company.

The cash offer of USD 10.80 per share, made by funds owned by Berkshire Partners, Advent International and Bain Capital, was 11% more than SkillSoft’s closing price on Thursday. However, American depositary shares of the company edged past the offer to as high as USD 11.21, or up 15%, indicating that investors might be expecting a better offer.  As of Thursday’s close, the stock had dropped about 11% since touching a 52-week high of USD 10.99 in December, higher than the investor group’s offer.

‘We think we got the best price we could negotiate balancing a lot of the things that our board knows in terms of their understanding of the market,’ Chief Executive Chuck Moran said on a call with analysts.

The merger agreement has a ‘go-shop’ period, ending on March 6, that allows SkillSoft to scout for better offers.
However, the company said the board intends to recommend that shareholders vote in favour of the acquisition.

‘We would have hoped for a modestly higher price but business was challenging through this renewal period that they just completed,’ Craig-Hallum Capital analyst George Sutton told Reuters by phone.

‘The higher price would most likely come if there is a strategic buyer who can integrate the cost structure more effectively than a private equity firm.’

Signal Hill analyst Trace Urdan said possible strategic acquirers could include IBM and Accenture Plc.

Investment firm Columbia Wanger Asset Management is the largest stakeholder in SkillSoft with a 22% interest. The firm was not immediately available for comment.

Wedbush Securities analyst Ariel Sokol said in a note, ‘We wonder whether parties involved might have to increase the price of the company to mollify investors concerned that the company could potentially be sold a year too early.’

As of Thursday’s close, the company traded at a forward earnings multiple of 13 times and according to analysts the multiple could push to 16.5 times earnings. The offer values the company at 14.6 times 2010 earnings.

MARKET WOES

‘Characteristics of the training market have certainly shifted during this economic time. The growth rates have been reduced,’ CEO Moran said, adding that fiscal 2010 bookings were down from the prior year.

The company, which had revenue of USD 328 million for the year ended January 2009, provides Internet-based training courses and software to businesses and governments.

It competes with companies such as India’s NIIT, Kenexa and Blackboard Inc in the increasingly competitive e-learning software and services market.

The e-learning market accounts for a small part of the overall training market, and its growth has slowed in recent years due to the general economic slowdown and pricing pressures.

SkillSoft, whose customers include IBM, Merck, Toyota and Hilton, however, posted a higher-than-expected profit for the third quarter and raised its outlook for the year.

The company will continue to be headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, and led by the current management team, including Moran as CEO, it said.

The buyout will be financed with a USD 605 million financing package from Morgan Stanley and Barclays Capital, who are advising the investor group.”

~Sourced by I.S.

For more information, please visit NewsCenter…

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